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Perpetual euphoria [electronic resource] :on the duty to be happy / Pascal Bruckner ; translated by Steven Rendall.

By: Bruckner, Pascal.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010Description: 1 online resource (x, 244 p.).ISBN: 9781400835973 (electronic bk.); 1400835976 (electronic bk.).Uniform titles: Euphorie perp�etuelle. English Subject(s): Happiness -- History -- 19th century | Happiness -- History -- 20th century | Happiness -- Social aspects | Philosophy | PHILOSOPHY -- Social | PHILOSOPHY -- Ethics & Moral Philosophy | PHILOSOPHY / Political | 1800 - 1999 | Happiness | Happiness -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books. | History.DDC classification: 170 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Life as a dream and a lie -- The golden age and after? -- The disciplines of beatitude -- The bittersweet saga of dullness -- The extremists of routine -- Real life is not absent -- "The fat, prosperous elevation of the average, the mediocre" -- What is happiness for some is kitsch for others -- If money doesn't make you happy, give it back! -- The crime of suffering -- Impossible wisdom -- Conclusion Madame Verdurin's croissant.
Summary: Happiness today is not just a possibility or an option but a requirement and a duty. To fail to be happy is to fail utterly. Happiness has become a religion--one whose smiley-faced god looks down in rebuke upon everyone who hasn't yet attained the blessed state of perpetual euphoria. How has a liberating principle of the Enlightenment--the right to pursue happiness--become the unavoidable and burdensome responsibility to be happy? How did we become unhappy about not being happy--and what might we do to escape this predicament? In Perpetual Euphoria, Pascal Bruckner takes up these questions wit.
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Includes index.

Life as a dream and a lie -- The golden age and after? -- The disciplines of beatitude -- The bittersweet saga of dullness -- The extremists of routine -- Real life is not absent -- "The fat, prosperous elevation of the average, the mediocre" -- What is happiness for some is kitsch for others -- If money doesn't make you happy, give it back! -- The crime of suffering -- Impossible wisdom -- Conclusion Madame Verdurin's croissant.

Happiness today is not just a possibility or an option but a requirement and a duty. To fail to be happy is to fail utterly. Happiness has become a religion--one whose smiley-faced god looks down in rebuke upon everyone who hasn't yet attained the blessed state of perpetual euphoria. How has a liberating principle of the Enlightenment--the right to pursue happiness--become the unavoidable and burdensome responsibility to be happy? How did we become unhappy about not being happy--and what might we do to escape this predicament? In Perpetual Euphoria, Pascal Bruckner takes up these questions wit.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on print version record.

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