Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Democracy's spectacle [electronic resource] :sovereignty and public life in antebellum American writing / Jennifer Greiman.

By: Greiman, Jennifer.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Fordham University Press, 2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (xi, 276 p.).ISBN: 9780823241156 (electronic bk.); 0823241157 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Politics and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Democracy in literature | Sovereignty in literature | Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Democracy -- Psychological aspects | Literatur | Gesellschaftsleben (Motiv) | Klassenbewusstsein (Motiv) | Rassenfrage (Motiv) | Politik (Motiv) | USA | LITERARY CRITICISM / American / General | American literature | Democracy in literature | Democracy -- Psychological aspects | Literature and society | Politics and literature | Sovereignty in literature | United States | Geschichte 1800-1865 | 1800 - 1899Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | History.DDC classification: 810.9/358735 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
"The thing is new": sovereignty and slavery in Democracy in America -- Color, race, and the spectacle of opinion in Beaumont's Marie -- "The hangman's accomplice": spectacle and complicity in Lydia Maria Child's New York -- The spectacle of reform: theater and prison in Hawthorne's Blithedale romance -- Theatricality, strangeness, and democracy in Melville's Confidence-man.
Summary: Drawing on Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, along with work by Gustave de Beaumont, Lydia Maria Child, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville, Greiman tracks the crises of sovereign power as it migrates out of the state to become a constitutive feature of the public sphere. Bringing together literature and political theory, she argues that the antebellum public sphere emerges as a spectacle with investments in both punishment and entertainment.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: ( votes)
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-270) and index.

"The thing is new": sovereignty and slavery in Democracy in America -- Color, race, and the spectacle of opinion in Beaumont's Marie -- "The hangman's accomplice": spectacle and complicity in Lydia Maria Child's New York -- The spectacle of reform: theater and prison in Hawthorne's Blithedale romance -- Theatricality, strangeness, and democracy in Melville's Confidence-man.

Description based on print version record.

Drawing on Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, along with work by Gustave de Beaumont, Lydia Maria Child, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville, Greiman tracks the crises of sovereign power as it migrates out of the state to become a constitutive feature of the public sphere. Bringing together literature and political theory, she argues that the antebellum public sphere emerges as a spectacle with investments in both punishment and entertainment.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Goodreads reviews for Democracy's spectacle


Copyright © Global Library,O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonepat-Narela Road, Sonepat, Haryana (India) - 131001 | Powered by Koha

Visitors since February 2014

website counter


Hosted, Implemented, Customized & Maintained by: BestBookBuddies -- an OpenLX initiative

Powered by Koha