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Black and Blue : African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party / Paul Frymer.

By: Frymer, Paul [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives ; 123.Publisher: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, [2011]Copyright date: ©2008Edition: Course Book.Description: 1 online resource : 4 halftones. 1 table.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400837267.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Labor policy -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Labor unions -- United States -- History -- 20th century | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Labor & Industrial RelationsDDC classification: 331.880973/09045 Online resources: Click here to access online | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. The Dual Development of National Labor Policy -- Chapter 3. The NAACP Confronts Racism in the Labor Movement -- Chapter 4. The Legal State -- Chapter 5. Labor Law and Institutional Racism -- Chapter 6. Conclusion: Law and Democracy -- NOTES -- INDEX -- Backmatter
Title is part of eBook package:PUP eBook-Package 2000-2015Title is part of eBook package:Princeton Univ. Press eBook Package 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package Backlist 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package Backlist 2000-2014Summary: In the 1930s, fewer than one in one hundred U.S. labor union members were African American. By 1980, the figure was more than one in five. Black and Blue explores the politics and history that led to this dramatic integration of organized labor. In the process, the book tells a broader story about how the Democratic Party unintentionally sowed the seeds of labor's decline. The labor and civil rights movements are the cornerstones of the Democratic Party, but for much of the twentieth century these movements worked independently of one another. Paul Frymer argues that as Democrats passed separate legislation to promote labor rights and racial equality they split the issues of class and race into two sets of institutions, neither of which had enough authority to integrate the labor movement. From this division, the courts became the leading enforcers of workplace civil rights, threatening unions with bankruptcy if they resisted integration. The courts' previously unappreciated power, however, was also a problem: in diversifying unions, judges and lawyers enfeebled them financially, thus democratizing through destruction. Sharply delineating the double-edged sword of state and legal power, Black and Blue chronicles an achievement that was as problematic as it was remarkable, and that demonstrates the deficiencies of race- and class-based understandings of labor, equality, and power in America.
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. The Dual Development of National Labor Policy -- Chapter 3. The NAACP Confronts Racism in the Labor Movement -- Chapter 4. The Legal State -- Chapter 5. Labor Law and Institutional Racism -- Chapter 6. Conclusion: Law and Democracy -- NOTES -- INDEX -- Backmatter

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In the 1930s, fewer than one in one hundred U.S. labor union members were African American. By 1980, the figure was more than one in five. Black and Blue explores the politics and history that led to this dramatic integration of organized labor. In the process, the book tells a broader story about how the Democratic Party unintentionally sowed the seeds of labor's decline. The labor and civil rights movements are the cornerstones of the Democratic Party, but for much of the twentieth century these movements worked independently of one another. Paul Frymer argues that as Democrats passed separate legislation to promote labor rights and racial equality they split the issues of class and race into two sets of institutions, neither of which had enough authority to integrate the labor movement. From this division, the courts became the leading enforcers of workplace civil rights, threatening unions with bankruptcy if they resisted integration. The courts' previously unappreciated power, however, was also a problem: in diversifying unions, judges and lawyers enfeebled them financially, thus democratizing through destruction. Sharply delineating the double-edged sword of state and legal power, Black and Blue chronicles an achievement that was as problematic as it was remarkable, and that demonstrates the deficiencies of race- and class-based understandings of labor, equality, and power in America.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 08. Jul 2019)

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