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Uneasy Alliances : Race and Party Competition in America / Paul Frymer.

By: Frymer, Paul [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives ; 114.Publisher: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, [2010]Copyright date: ©2011Edition: With a New afterword by the author.Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400836413.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History | African Americans -- Political activity -- History | Political parties -- United States -- History | Political parties -- United States | Racism -- Political aspects -- United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Process / Political PartiesDDC classification: 324.0896073 Online resources: Click here to access online | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. Competitive Parties and the "Invisibility" of Captured Groups -- Chapter 3. National Party Competition and the Disenfranchisement of Black Voters in the South, 1866-1932 -- Chapter 4. Capture Inside the Democratic Party, 1965-1996 -- Chapter 5. Party Education and Mobilization and the Captured Group -- Chapter 6. Black Representation in Congress -- Chapter 7. Is the Concept of Electoral Capture Applicable to Other Groups? The Case of Gay and Lesbian Voters in the Democratic Party and the Christian Right in the Republican Party -- Afterword to the 2010 Edition. Obama and the Representation of Captured Groups -- Index
Title is part of eBook package:PUP eBook-Package 2000-2015Summary: Uneasy Alliances is a powerful challenge to how we think about the relationship between race, political parties, and American democracy. While scholars frequently claim that the need to win elections makes government officials responsive to any and all voters, Paul Frymer shows that not all groups are treated equally; politicians spend most of their time and resources on white swing voters--to the detriment of the African American community. As both parties try to attract white swing voters by distancing themselves from blacks, black voters are often ignored and left with unappealing alternatives. African Americans are thus the leading example of a "captured minority." Frymer argues that our two-party system bears much of the blame for this state of affairs. Often overlooked in current discussions of racial politics, the party system represents a genuine form of institutional racism. Frymer shows that this is no accident, for the party system was set up in part to keep African American concerns off the political agenda. Today, the party system continues to restrict the political opportunities of African American voters, as was shown most recently when Bill Clinton took pains to distance himself from African Americans in order to capture conservative votes and win the presidency. Frymer compares the position of black voters with other social groups--gays and lesbians and the Christian right, for example--who have recently found themselves similarly "captured." Rigorously argued and researched, Uneasy Alliances is a powerful challenge to how we think about the relationship between black voters, political parties, and American democracy. In a new afterword, Frymer examines the impact of Barack Obama's election on the delicate relationship between race and party politics in America.
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. Competitive Parties and the "Invisibility" of Captured Groups -- Chapter 3. National Party Competition and the Disenfranchisement of Black Voters in the South, 1866-1932 -- Chapter 4. Capture Inside the Democratic Party, 1965-1996 -- Chapter 5. Party Education and Mobilization and the Captured Group -- Chapter 6. Black Representation in Congress -- Chapter 7. Is the Concept of Electoral Capture Applicable to Other Groups? The Case of Gay and Lesbian Voters in the Democratic Party and the Christian Right in the Republican Party -- Afterword to the 2010 Edition. Obama and the Representation of Captured Groups -- Index

Uneasy Alliances is a powerful challenge to how we think about the relationship between race, political parties, and American democracy. While scholars frequently claim that the need to win elections makes government officials responsive to any and all voters, Paul Frymer shows that not all groups are treated equally; politicians spend most of their time and resources on white swing voters--to the detriment of the African American community. As both parties try to attract white swing voters by distancing themselves from blacks, black voters are often ignored and left with unappealing alternatives. African Americans are thus the leading example of a "captured minority." Frymer argues that our two-party system bears much of the blame for this state of affairs. Often overlooked in current discussions of racial politics, the party system represents a genuine form of institutional racism. Frymer shows that this is no accident, for the party system was set up in part to keep African American concerns off the political agenda. Today, the party system continues to restrict the political opportunities of African American voters, as was shown most recently when Bill Clinton took pains to distance himself from African Americans in order to capture conservative votes and win the presidency. Frymer compares the position of black voters with other social groups--gays and lesbians and the Christian right, for example--who have recently found themselves similarly "captured." Rigorously argued and researched, Uneasy Alliances is a powerful challenge to how we think about the relationship between black voters, political parties, and American democracy. In a new afterword, Frymer examines the impact of Barack Obama's election on the delicate relationship between race and party politics in America.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 23. Mai 2019)

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