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Disjointed Pluralism : Institutional Innovation and the Development of the U.S. Congress / Eric Schickler.

By: Schickler, Eric [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives ; 124.Publisher: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, [2011]Copyright date: ©2001Edition: Core Textbook.Description: 1 online resource : 4 line illus., 19 tables.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400824250.Subject(s): Legislators -- United States -- History | Organizational change -- United States -- History | POLITICAL SCIENCE / American Government / Legislative BranchDDC classification: 328.73/09 Online resources: Click here to access online | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Disjointed Pluralism and Institutional Change -- Chapter 2. Institutional Development, 1890-1910: An Experiment in Party Government -- Chapter 3. Institutional Development, 1919-1932: Cross-Party Coalitions, Bloc Government, and Republican Rule -- Chapter 4. Institutional Development, 1937-1952: The Conservative Coalition, Congress against the Executive, and Committee Government -- Chapter 5. Institutional Development, 1970-1989: A Return to Party Government or the Triumph of Individualism? -- Chapter 6. Understanding Congressional Change -- Epilogue. Institutional Change in the 1990s -- Appendix A. Case Selection -- Appendix B. Votes Pertaining to Institutional Changes in Each Period -- Notes -- References -- Index
Title is part of eBook package:PUP eBook-Package 2000-2015Title is part of eBook package:Princeton Univ. Press eBook Package 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package Backlist 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package Backlist 2000-2014Summary: From the 1910 overthrow of "Czar" Joseph Cannon to the reforms enacted when Republicans took over the House in 1995, institutional change within the U.S. Congress has been both a product and a shaper of congressional politics. For several decades, scholars have explained this process in terms of a particular collective interest shared by members, be it partisanship, reelection worries, or policy motivations. Eric Schickler makes the case that it is actually interplay among multiple interests that determines institutional change. In the process, he explains how congressional institutions have proved remarkably adaptable and yet consistently frustrating for members and outside observers alike. Analyzing leadership, committee, and procedural restructuring in four periods (1890-1910, 1919-1932, 1937-1952, and 1970-1989), Schickler argues that coalitions promoting a wide range of member interests drive change in both the House and Senate. He shows that multiple interests determine institutional innovation within a period; that different interests are important in different periods; and, more broadly, that changes in the salient collective interests across time do not follow a simple logical or developmental sequence. Institutional development appears disjointed, as new arrangements are layered on preexisting structures intended to serve competing interests. An epilogue assesses the rise and fall of Newt Gingrich in light of these findings. Schickler's model of "disjointed pluralism" integrates rational choice theory with historical institutionalist approaches. It both complicates and advances efforts at theoretical synthesis by proposing a fuller, more nuanced understanding of institutional innovation--and thus of American political development and history.
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Disjointed Pluralism and Institutional Change -- Chapter 2. Institutional Development, 1890-1910: An Experiment in Party Government -- Chapter 3. Institutional Development, 1919-1932: Cross-Party Coalitions, Bloc Government, and Republican Rule -- Chapter 4. Institutional Development, 1937-1952: The Conservative Coalition, Congress against the Executive, and Committee Government -- Chapter 5. Institutional Development, 1970-1989: A Return to Party Government or the Triumph of Individualism? -- Chapter 6. Understanding Congressional Change -- Epilogue. Institutional Change in the 1990s -- Appendix A. Case Selection -- Appendix B. Votes Pertaining to Institutional Changes in Each Period -- Notes -- References -- Index

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From the 1910 overthrow of "Czar" Joseph Cannon to the reforms enacted when Republicans took over the House in 1995, institutional change within the U.S. Congress has been both a product and a shaper of congressional politics. For several decades, scholars have explained this process in terms of a particular collective interest shared by members, be it partisanship, reelection worries, or policy motivations. Eric Schickler makes the case that it is actually interplay among multiple interests that determines institutional change. In the process, he explains how congressional institutions have proved remarkably adaptable and yet consistently frustrating for members and outside observers alike. Analyzing leadership, committee, and procedural restructuring in four periods (1890-1910, 1919-1932, 1937-1952, and 1970-1989), Schickler argues that coalitions promoting a wide range of member interests drive change in both the House and Senate. He shows that multiple interests determine institutional innovation within a period; that different interests are important in different periods; and, more broadly, that changes in the salient collective interests across time do not follow a simple logical or developmental sequence. Institutional development appears disjointed, as new arrangements are layered on preexisting structures intended to serve competing interests. An epilogue assesses the rise and fall of Newt Gingrich in light of these findings. Schickler's model of "disjointed pluralism" integrates rational choice theory with historical institutionalist approaches. It both complicates and advances efforts at theoretical synthesis by proposing a fuller, more nuanced understanding of institutional innovation--and thus of American political development and history.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 08. Jul 2019)

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