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The Unsolid South : Mass Politics and National Representation in a One-Party Enclave / Devin Caughey.

By: Caughey, Devin [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives ; 165.Publisher: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, [2018]Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resource : 20 b/w illus., 3 tables.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780691184005.Subject(s): Democracy -- Southern States -- History | Political parties -- Southern States -- History | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Process / Political PartiesDDC classification: 324.975 Online resources: Click here to access online | Cover
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The One-Party South: An Analytic Framework -- 3. Public Opinion in South and Nation -- 4. Southern Democrats in Congress -- 5. Democratic Primaries and the Selectoral Connection -- 6. Representation in the One-Party South -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Index
Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE 2018 EnglishTitle is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE COMPLETE 2018Title is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE Economics and Social Sciences 2018 EnglishTitle is part of eBook package:EBOOK PACKAGE Social Sciences 2018Title is part of eBook package:PUP eBook-Package 2019Title is part of eBook package:PUP eBook-Package Pilot Project 2019Title is part of eBook package:Princeton Univ. Press eBook-Package Pilot Project 2018Summary: During the Jim Crow era, the Democratic Party dominated the American South, presiding over a racially segregated society while also playing an outsized role in national politics. In this compelling book, Devin Caughey provides an entirely new understanding of electoral competition and national representation in this exclusionary one-party enclave. Challenging the notion that the Democratic Party's political monopoly inhibited competition and served only the Southern elite, he demonstrates how Democratic primaries-even as they excluded African Americans-provided forums for ordinary whites to press their interests.Focusing on politics during and after the New Deal, Caughey shows that congressional primary elections effectively substituted for partisan competition, in part because the spillover from national party conflict helped compensate for the informational deficits of elections without party labels. Caughey draws on a broad range of historical and quantitative evidence, including archival materials, primary election returns, congressional voting records, and hundreds of early public opinion polls that illuminate ideological patterns in the Southern public. Defying the received wisdom, this evidence reveals that members of Congress from the one-party South were no less responsive to their electorates than members from states with true partisan competition.Reinterpreting a critical period in American history, The Unsolid South reshapes our understanding of the role of parties in democratic theory and sheds critical new light on electoral politics in authoritarian regimes.
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The One-Party South: An Analytic Framework -- 3. Public Opinion in South and Nation -- 4. Southern Democrats in Congress -- 5. Democratic Primaries and the Selectoral Connection -- 6. Representation in the One-Party South -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Index

During the Jim Crow era, the Democratic Party dominated the American South, presiding over a racially segregated society while also playing an outsized role in national politics. In this compelling book, Devin Caughey provides an entirely new understanding of electoral competition and national representation in this exclusionary one-party enclave. Challenging the notion that the Democratic Party's political monopoly inhibited competition and served only the Southern elite, he demonstrates how Democratic primaries-even as they excluded African Americans-provided forums for ordinary whites to press their interests.Focusing on politics during and after the New Deal, Caughey shows that congressional primary elections effectively substituted for partisan competition, in part because the spillover from national party conflict helped compensate for the informational deficits of elections without party labels. Caughey draws on a broad range of historical and quantitative evidence, including archival materials, primary election returns, congressional voting records, and hundreds of early public opinion polls that illuminate ideological patterns in the Southern public. Defying the received wisdom, this evidence reveals that members of Congress from the one-party South were no less responsive to their electorates than members from states with true partisan competition.Reinterpreting a critical period in American history, The Unsolid South reshapes our understanding of the role of parties in democratic theory and sheds critical new light on electoral politics in authoritarian regimes.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

In English.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 23. Mai 2019)

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