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Happiness, morality, and freedom / by Arthur Melnick.

By: Melnick, Arthur.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Studies in Moral Philosophy: 8.; Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy E-Books Online, Collection 2015, ISBN: 9789004287471: Publisher: Boston : Brill, 2014Description: 1 online resource (xii, 212 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789004283213.Subject(s): Happiness | Ethics | Liberty | Ethics | Happiness | LibertyDDC classification: 170 Online resources: DOI:
Contents:
Summary: To be happy is to be emotionally and evaluatively satisfied with one’s life according to a standard of satisfaction one can claim as one’s own as a reasoning being. Since there is no definitive proof of what the standard of satisfaction is, being open to the devising and testing of standards by others is part of claiming one’s own standard as a reasoning being. This open-ness is equivalent to being open to and hence respecting and caring for the pursuit of happiness of others. Since such respect and care is what it is to be moral, it follows that one cannot be happy without being moral.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Preliminary Material -- Happiness as Endorsed Contentment -- The Final Good and the Final End -- Reason and True Happiness -- The Happiness of Others -- The Fundamental Principle of Morality -- The Content of the Fundamental Principle -- Other Accounts of Morality -- Freedom, Deliberation, and the Self -- Freedom, Ultimate Power, and Ultimate Responsibility -- Bibliography -- Index.

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To be happy is to be emotionally and evaluatively satisfied with one’s life according to a standard of satisfaction one can claim as one’s own as a reasoning being. Since there is no definitive proof of what the standard of satisfaction is, being open to the devising and testing of standards by others is part of claiming one’s own standard as a reasoning being. This open-ness is equivalent to being open to and hence respecting and caring for the pursuit of happiness of others. Since such respect and care is what it is to be moral, it follows that one cannot be happy without being moral.

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