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Copyright's excess money and music in the U.S. recording industry

By: Lunney, Glynn.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York Cambridge University Press 2018Description: xiii, 238p. illustrations 24 cm.ISBN: 9781316632796.Subject(s): Copyright -- Music -- United States | Music -- Economic aspects -- United StatesDDC classification: 338.47780973
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. The (Surprisingly Weak) Economic Case for Copyright -- 3. Copyright and Revenue in the Recording Industry -- 4. Measuring Music Output -- 5. The Search for a Correlation: Was More Money Associated with More or Better Music? -- 6. More Money Meant Less Music -- 7. Rationalizing Copyright. 520 $a Far more than 200 years, copyright in the United States has rested on a simple premise: more copyright will lead to more money for copyright owners, and more money will lead to more original works of authorship. In this important, illuminating book, Glynn Lunney tests that premise by tracking the rise and fall of the sound recording copyright from 1961-2015, along with the associated rise and fall in sales of recorded music. Far from supporting copyright's fundamental premise, the empirical evidence finds the exact opposite relationship: more revenue led to fewer and lower-quality hit songs. Lunney's breakthrough research shows that what copyright does is vastly increase the earnings of our most popular artists and songs. Doing so reduced their productivity. At the same time, copyright did very little to increase the earnings of, and hence increase the productivity of, artists at the margins. The net result: more revenue was associated with the release of fewer hit songs. This book should be read by anyone interested in how copyright operates in the real world.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books O. P. Jindal Global University Library
338.47780973 LU-C (Browse shelf) Available 140713

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Introduction -- 2. The (Surprisingly Weak) Economic Case for Copyright -- 3. Copyright and Revenue in the Recording Industry -- 4. Measuring Music Output -- 5. The Search for a Correlation: Was More Money Associated with More or Better Music? -- 6. More Money Meant Less Music -- 7. Rationalizing Copyright. 520 $a Far more than 200 years, copyright in the United States has rested on a simple premise: more copyright will lead to more money for copyright owners, and more money will lead to more original works of authorship. In this important, illuminating book, Glynn Lunney tests that premise by tracking the rise and fall of the sound recording copyright from 1961-2015, along with the associated rise and fall in sales of recorded music. Far from supporting copyright's fundamental premise, the empirical evidence finds the exact opposite relationship: more revenue led to fewer and lower-quality hit songs. Lunney's breakthrough research shows that what copyright does is vastly increase the earnings of our most popular artists and songs. Doing so reduced their productivity. At the same time, copyright did very little to increase the earnings of, and hence increase the productivity of, artists at the margins. The net result: more revenue was associated with the release of fewer hit songs. This book should be read by anyone interested in how copyright operates in the real world.

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