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Democracy's privileged few [electronic resource] :legislative privilege and democratic norms in the British and American constitutions / Josh Chafetz.

By: Chafetz, Joshua A. (Joshua Aaron), 1979-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, �2007Description: 1 online resource (x, 307 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300134896 (electronic bk.); 0300134894 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): United States. Congress -- Privileges and immunities | Constitutional law -- United States | Great Britain. Parliament -- Privileges and immunities | Constitutional law -- Great Britain | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Government -- Legislative Branch | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- General | Grondwetten | Parlementsleden | Bevoegdheden | Bescherming | Verenigde Staten | Verenigd Koninkrijk van Groot-Brittanni�e en Noord-Ierland | Gro�britannien / Parlament | USA / Kongress | Verfassung <1787> | Immunit�at <Recht> | Abgeordneter | Verfassungsrecht | Privileg | USA | Gro�britannien | Great Britain. Parliament | United States. Congress | Constitutional law | Great Britain | United States | United States. Congress -- Privileges and immunities -- Privileges and immunities | Great Britain. Parliament -- Privileges and immunities -- Privileges and immunitiesGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Privileges and immunities.DDC classification: 328.41/074 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Lex parliamenti vs. lex terrae -- Political questions and nonjusticiability -- Free speech in Parliament -- Free speech in Congress -- Freedom from civil arrest and legal process for members of Parliament -- Freedom from civil arrest for members of Congress -- Disputed parliamentary elections -- Disputed congressional elections -- Breach of privilege and contempt of Parliament -- Punishment by Congress.
digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain's Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analysing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-294) and index.

Lex parliamenti vs. lex terrae -- Political questions and nonjusticiability -- Free speech in Parliament -- Free speech in Congress -- Freedom from civil arrest and legal process for members of Parliament -- Freedom from civil arrest for members of Congress -- Disputed parliamentary elections -- Disputed congressional elections -- Breach of privilege and contempt of Parliament -- Punishment by Congress.

This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain's Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analysing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy.

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Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212 MiAaHDL

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