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Information and elections [electronic resource] /R. Michael Alvarez.

By: Alvarez, R. Michael, 1964-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Michigan studies in political analysis: Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c1998Edition: Rev. to include the 1996 presidential election.Description: 1 online resource (xi, 287 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780472022373 (electronic bk.); 0472022377 (electronic bk.); 0472085751 (alk. paper); 9780472085750 (alk. paper).Other title: Information & elections [Cover title].Subject(s): Presidents -- United States -- Election | Voting -- United States | Political campaigns -- United States | Communication in politics -- United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Process -- General | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Process -- Elections | Verkiezingen | Informatie | �Elections -- �Etats-Unis | Communication en politique -- �Etats-Unis | Pr�esidents -- �Etats-Unis -- �Election (1996) | USA -- Pr�asident | Information | Pr�asidentenwahl | Wahlverhalten | Geschichte 1976-1996 | Communication in politics | Political campaigns | Presidents -- Election | Voting registers | United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 324.973/092 Online resources: EBSCOhost Summary: R. Michael Alvarez examines how voters make their decisions in presidential elections. He begins with the assumption that voters have neither the incentive nor the inclination to be well-informed about politics and presidential candidates. Candidates themselves have incentives to provide ambiguous information about themselves, their records and their issue positions. Yet the author shows that a tremendous amount of information is made available about presidential candidates. And he uncovers clear and striking evidence that people are not likely to vote for candidates about whom they know very little. Alvarez explores how voters learn about candidates through the course of a campaign. He provides a detailed analysis of the media coverage of presidential campaigns and shows that there is a tremendous amount of media coverage of these campaigns, that much of this coverage is about issues and is informative, and that voters learn from this coverage.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-282) and index.

Description based on print version record.

R. Michael Alvarez examines how voters make their decisions in presidential elections. He begins with the assumption that voters have neither the incentive nor the inclination to be well-informed about politics and presidential candidates. Candidates themselves have incentives to provide ambiguous information about themselves, their records and their issue positions. Yet the author shows that a tremendous amount of information is made available about presidential candidates. And he uncovers clear and striking evidence that people are not likely to vote for candidates about whom they know very little. Alvarez explores how voters learn about candidates through the course of a campaign. He provides a detailed analysis of the media coverage of presidential campaigns and shows that there is a tremendous amount of media coverage of these campaigns, that much of this coverage is about issues and is informative, and that voters learn from this coverage.

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